The Twin Cities campus (UMTC) will offer two Study Away programs—in Social Justice and in Food Science and Systems.

Social Justice Study Away (based on minor)

The vision of the Social Justice Minor is to create an interdisciplinary, cross-collegiate undergraduate program where students can create socially just communities in their classrooms, and where there is respectful space for all opinions. We envision dialogic classrooms where students find spaces of possibility, where learning draws on theory and practice, and where students value learning in various communities beyond the University. We believe in equity and fairness in every aspect of human experience, and the importance of recognizing the struggles for liberation and the social movements of many peoples globally. The Social Justice Study Away Program at UMTC allows students to complete an intensive one-semester series of classes on the topic, including several core courses and three electives from a large list of possibilities.

Students would need to take 2501W and 3501 or 3501 plus 3 additional classes from the electives list.

Core Classes in the Minor

SW 2501W: Introduction to Social Justice (4 cr)

This class focuses on the meanings of social justice by looking at three key socio-political areas: Globalization, criminal justice, and social welfare. Students will do 30 hours of service learning in a social justice organization.

SW 1501: Introduction to Peace Studies (3 cr)

This course provides an introduction to peace studies - an interdisciplinary field that considers questions such as: how can human conflicts be resolved in ways that promote justice and peace? We will explore definitions, conditions, and causes of violence, nonviolence, war, and peace—be it between nations, groups, or individuals. Students will do 30 hours of service learning in a social justice organization.

SW 3501: Theories & Practices of Social Change Organizing (4 cr)

This class focuses on 21st Century models of social justice movement building. Students will do 30 hours of service learning in a social justice organization.

Elective Classes

Afro-American & African Studies

AFRO 3120: Social and Intellectual Movements in the African Diaspora (3 cr)

Political, cultural, historical linkages between Africans, African-Americans, African-Caribbean. Black socio-political movements/radical intellectual trends in late 19th/20th centuries. Colonialism/racism. Protest organizations, radical movements in United States/Europe.

AFRO 3251W: Sociological Perspectives on Race, Class, and Gender (3 cr)

Analytical overview of three major forms of inequalities in the United Sates today: race, class, gender. Focus on these inequalities as relatively autonomous from one another and as deeply connected/intertwined with one another. Intersectionality key to critical understanding of these social forces. Social change possibilities.

AFRO 3426: African Americans, Social Policy, and the Welfare State (3 cr)

Period between New Deal (1930s) and present. History/impact of federal policy (presidential, congressional, judicial) and race on African Americans. Politics of allocation of insurance versus relief in Social Security Act of 1935. Race and expansion of social benefits after World War II. School desegregation. Kennedy's civil rights policy, LBJ's War on Poverty. Affirmative Action. Warren court. Busing. Conservative retreat from welfare state under Ronald Reagan and George Bush.

AFRO 3866: The Civil Rights and Black Power Movement, 1954-1984 (3 cr)

Modern black civil rights struggle in the U.S., i.e., the second reconstruction. Failure of reconstruction, abdication of black civil rights in 19th century. Assault on white supremacy via courts, state, and grass roots southern movement in 1950s and 1960s. Black struggle in north and west. New emphasis on Black Power, by new organizations. Ascendancy of Ronald Reagan, conservative assault on the movement.

AFRO 4231: Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3 cr)

Examination of structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.

American Indian Studies

AMIN 4231: Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3 cr)

Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.

American Studies

AMST 3001: Contemporary Perspectives on Asian America (3 cr)

Interdisciplinary overview of Asian American identities. Post-1965 migration/community. History, cultural productions, and concerns of Americans of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, Filipino, and Southeast Asian ancestry.

Asian American Studies

AAS 1101: Imagining Asian America (3 cr)

Issues in Asian American Studies. Historical/recent aspects of the diverse/multifaceted vision of "Asian America," using histories, films, memoirs, and other texts as illustrations.

AAS 3301: Asian America Through Arts and Culture (3 cr)

Interdisciplinary questions of Asian American experience, identity, and community. Literature, dance, music, photography, film, theater, other cultural forms. Students work with local Asian American arts groups/organizations. Students express their own cultural contradictions through writing and other forms of artistic expression and attend local arts events.

AAS 4231: Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3 cr)

Structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.

Chicano Studies

CHIC 1112: Introduction to Chicana/o Studies: Critical Paradigms (3 cr)

Prevailing paradigms of analysis, methodologies of research, and guiding theoretical concepts that have shaped Chicano studies. Chicano history, culture, and meanings, including migration, repatriation, community formation, Chicano movement. Contemporary trends in art and culture.

CHIC 1275: Service Learning in the Chicano/Latino Community (3 cr)

Normative/applied ethics used to reflect on personal/societal responsibilities and to analyze U.S. educational systems. Institutional/social constraints on equitable educational opportunities for Chicano/Latino students. Models of inclusive/just education. Students tutor/mentor Chicanos/Latinos, dialogue with Chicano/Latino educators.

CHIC 3212: Chicana Studies: La Chicana in Contemporary Society (3 cr)

Scholarly/creative work of Chicanas or politically defined women of Mexican American community. Interdisciplinary. Historical context, cultural process, and autoethnography.

CHIC 3275: Service Learning in the Chicano/Latino Community (3 cr)

Normative/applied ethics used to reflect on personal/societal responsibilities and to analyze U.S. educational systems. Institutional/social constraints on equitable educational opportunities for Chicano/Latino students. Models of inclusive/just education. Students tutor/mentor Chicanos/Latinos, dialogue with Chicano/Latino educators.

CHIC 3374: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States: Families, Work, and Advocacy (4 cr)

Social, economic, legal realities of migrant farmworkers. Demographic shifts/movements. How organizing, advocacy, consumer influence act as change agents ethical dilemma of consuming cheap food. Significant work completed outside classroom, including trip to migrant camp.

CHIC 3446: Chicana/o History II: WWII, El Movimiento, and the New Millennium (3 cr)

Experiences of people of Mexican descent in the U.S. Notions of citizenship from WWII. Chicano civil rights movement. Impact of immigration patterns/legislation. Cultural wars, changing demographics. Social, economic, and political changes that influenced day-to-day life of Mexican Americans. Meaning of racialized "Mexican" identity. How different groups of Mexicans have understood their relationships to other Americans and other Latino groups.

CHIC 4231: Color of Public Policy: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans & Chicanos in the U.S. (3 cr)

Examination of the structural or institutional conditions through which people of color have been marginalized in public policy. Critical evaluation of social theory in addressing the problem of contemporary communities of color in the United States.

CHIC 4275: Theory in Action: Community Engagement in a Social Justice Framework (3 cr)

Theoretical frameworks of social justice and community engagement for work outside classroom with/in Latina/o community. Worker issues/organizing. Placements in unions, worker organizations. Policy initiatives on labor issues. Students reflect on their own identity development, social location, and position of power/privilege.

Food Science and Systems Study Away

The mission of the food science and the nutrition major is to conduct research, provide knowledge, and develop skills to improve food and health. From the field to your plate, food science and nutrition both play a key role in getting food to your table. Components of a food system include farming, food processing, distribution, consumption, recycling, and much more.

Food systems are interconnected sets of biological, technological, economic, and social activities that nourish human populations. The activities include farming, food processing and manufacturing, food distribution and retailing, food consumption, and managing post-consumption food waste. Food systems can range from local to international, from traditional to organic. Students in this major learn to solve real-world problems sustainably and to study possible improvements to the system. Life as we know it depends on food systems functioning successfully.

Requirements

Students must take FSCN 1112, Principles of Nutrition; FSCN 3102, Introduction to Food Science; and three additional courses in food science/systems. Note: For this track, many courses have prerequisities.

Food Science Courses

FSCN 1112: Principles of Nutrition (3 cr)

Fundamental concepts of nutrition, nutrient functions, human nutritional requirements, food sources. Evaluating nutrition information and food safety. Role of nutrition in chronic disease, public policy, and the environment.

FSCN 3102: Introduction to Food Science (3 cr)

Introduction to chemical/physical properties of foods. Evaluating interaction/reaction of foods due to formulation, processing, preparation.

FSCN 4121: Food Microbiology (3 cr)

Microorganisms involved in food-borne disease, food fermentations, and food spoilage. Methods for their control/detection. Food microbiology. Foodborne pathogens. Microbial food spoilage. Control of microorganisms in food.

FSCN 4122: Food Fermentations and Biotechnology (2 cr)

Major food fermentations important for food industry. Microbiological components. Impact of biotechnology on food production. Genetic tools. Improvement of microbes used in food production by biotechnological approaches.

FSCN 4123: Molecular Biology for Applied Scientists (1 cr)

Half semester course. Two hours/week for 8 weeks. Basics of molecular biology. Origins of molecular biology from discovery to gene cloning/sequencing technologies. PCR, DNA fingerprinting, metagenomics. Synthetic biology for biotechnological production of novel peptides/ proteins.

FSCN 4131: Food Quality (3 cr)

Management systems in processing/distribution of foods that ensure food quality/compliance with food laws/regulations. Quality management, HACCP, audits, plant/equipment design for sanitation, specifications, recalls, control systems.

FSCN 4312W: Food Analysis (4 cr)

Components in foods. Focuses on analytical measurement. Chemical, physical, and sensory techniques to identify/characterize major/minor components in food systems.

FSCN 4332: Food Processing Operations (3 cr)

Engineering principles applied to commonly used food processing operations. Blanching, pasteurization, sterilization, frying, baking, milling, extrusion. Meat processing, water treatment, waste management.

FSCN 4311: Chemical Reactions in Food Systems (2 cr)

Chemical structure of major food constituents, carbohydrates, lipid, and proteins. Reaction/interaction pathways. Function within complex food matrix under various storage/processing conditions.

FSCN 4112: Food Chemistry and Functional Foods (3 cr)

Most-important food constituents, their occurrence, structures, functional properties, and health benefits. Proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, water. Vitamins, minerals, enzymes, phytochemicals, food additives, contaminants.

FSCN 4481: Sensory Evaluation of Food Quality (1 cr)

Fundamentals of sensory perception. Test designs and methods used in studying sensory qualities of foods and consumer responses to foods.

Food Systems Courses

AGRO 1660W: First-Year Colloquium/Experience in Agroecosystems Analysis (2 cr)

Agroecosystems and their impacts on the environment, landscapes, and rural communities. Students develop a course plan within their major, explore career options, and increase their familiarity with the department, its history, and its faculty/staff. Field trips, discussions, readings, reflective writings.

FDSY 2101: Plant Production Systems (3 cr)

How food production systems fit within overall food system. Fundamentals of soils, plant nutrition, plant production metabolites as they affect food production systems. Decisions that differentiate among conventional sustainable/organic systems.

BBE 3201: Sustainability of Food Systems: A Life Cycle Perspective (3 cr)

Consequences of global food system. Diversity in food systems. Current topics in food sustainability.

APEC 3202: An Introduction to the Food System: Analysis, Management and Design (3 cr)

Introduction to use of systems thinking for exploration of problems in contemporary food system from multidisciplinary perspective. System concepts. Historical evolution of food system. Analysis, management, design.

FDSY 4101: Holistic Approaches to Improving Food Systems Sustainability (3 cr)

Capstone course introduces soft-systems methodology (SSM). In strongly experiential/community-engaged learning environment, students will address sustainability challenges/ opportunities in local food systems.