Experience a vibrant residential academic community where every voice is heard at the University of Minnesota Morris (UMM). The campus will offer two Liberal Arts Colloquiums for U of M students each spring. Students will have the chance to explore different approaches to a subject by taking a cluster of courses around a specific topic or theme. These intimate and highly interactive classes (fewer than 20 students) will be taught by award-winning faculty. Students participating in Study Away at Morris take three colloquium courses plus one course in an additional area of interest as a means to explore the Morris liberal arts curriculum.

Colloquiums for Spring 2017

Liberal Arts Colloquium #1: Colonialism, Place, and Persistence in Indigenous Studies

This colloquium takes advantage of UMM’s strength in American Indian studies and the campus’s history as the location of a Native American boarding school. It features an introductory course in American Indian studies complemented by courses in American Indian survival strategies and world indigenous literature and film. Becca Gercken, associate professor of English and American Indian studies, will serve as the faculty adviser for system students who enroll in the colloquium.

The Morris Study Away program consists of three 4-credit colloquium courses plus an additional 4-credit liberal arts course of the student's choosing.

AMIN 1101: Introduction to American Indian Studies (4 cr)

T/TH 2-2:40 p.m. (Brian Twenter)

Introduction to American Indian histories, literature and other creative endeavors, and culture, with emphasis on sovereignty, effects of government policies, and diversity of American Indian societies.

ENGL 3312: World Indigenous Literature and Film (4 cr)

MWF 10-11:35 a.m. (Becca Gercken)

Comparative study of indigenous literature and film from North America, New Zealand, and Australia, emphasizing issues of gender, class, power, “passing,” and the racialized body.

HIST 3359: Native Strategies for Survival, 1880-1920 (4 cr)

T/Th 10-11:40 a.m. (Kevin Whalen)

Exploration of the events and policies that sought to eliminate American Indian communities and cultures and the strategies that American Indians developed to survive.

Liberal Arts Colloquium #2: Worldviews

This colloquium consists of three courses taught by Morse-Alumni Award–winning professors. The cornerstone course is in Morris’s interdisciplinary honors program. "Worldviews" examines scientific cosmologies and is offered by Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus Jim Togeas. This course is complemented by a course that examines core philosophical issues in religion, such as the existence and nature of God, taught by Distinguished Teaching Professor Pieranna Garavaso, and a history course on the Islamic World taught by Distinguished Teaching Professor Jennifer Deane. Distinguished Teaching Professor Janet Ericksen, who teaches English and directs Morris’s Honors Program, will serve as the faculty adviser for system students who enroll in the colloquium.

The Morris Study Away program consists of three 4-credit colloquium courses plus an additional 4-credit liberal arts course of the student's choosing.

IS 3241H: Honors: Worldviews (4 cr)

MWF 2:15-3:30 p.m. (Jim Togeas)

The major topics of this course are scientific cosmologies, the Copernican Revolution culminating in Newton’s System of the World, and modern cosmology beginning with the work of Einstein, Hubble, Friedmann, Lemaître, and Gamow, through the steady-state controversy, and culminating in the contemporary theory of the universe’s accelerated expansion. Minor topics will be brief excursions into worldviews not necessarily scientific, but nonetheless cosmologies.

PHIL 2121: Philosophy of Religion (4 cr)

T/Th 4-5:40 p.m. (Pieranna Garavaso)

The class explores a selection of philosophical issues concerning religion such as the notion of a divinity, the attempts to prove or refute the existence of a divine being, the relationship between faith and reason, the link between religion and morality, and the knowledge of a divinity.

HIST 3008: The Making of the Islamic World (4 cr)

T/Th 12-1:40 p.m. (Jennifer Deane)

The course examines the origins, spread, and impact of Islamic civilization from the 6th through 15th centuries with particular emphasis upon political, religious, and intellectual developments.